Albino Peacemakers

ALBINO PEACEMAKERS IN TANZANIA

Tanzania has the highest rate of albinism in the world. This genetic condition affects anywhere from 25,000 to 150,000 people in the nation. In addition to the serious health problems that result from lack of melanin, people with albinism face intense stigma and discrimination. Since the year 2000, more than 75 people with albinism have been killed. Most commonly they are bullied, shamed, beaten, chased from school, and maimed for body parts to be used for witchcraft and superstitious beliefs.

 

Sister Martha Mganga was born with albinism in northern Tanzania. She faced psychological and emotional abuse from her father as well as from her neighbors. At one point she even attempted suicide because of the abuse and stigma related to her condition. She still faces constant threats of violence and danger. But she is determined to advocate for children with albinism and change the way it is perceived. She founded Albino Peacemakers to provide direct advocacy and care for several dozen children with albinism who have endured multiple forms of trauma, and they are now making significant progress in their emotional and spiritual recovery. Albino Peacemakers is helping families accept and love their kids with albinism, and they are spreading the message across Tanzania that people with albinism are normal people worthy of kindness and compassion.


Children in the Sponsorship Program are cared for holistically, meaning that physical, emotional, spiritual, educational, and environmental factors are all considered in providing care for each child. The kids are all given the opportunity to attend a local school, and Lahash engages in ongoing training and development efforts with the East African staff to creatively and compassionately improve the children’s lives.

IMG_6040

SPONSOR A CHILD AT ALBINO PEACEMAKERS

    Sorry, no posts matched your criteria.

Learn more about sponsorship and meet other kids who are waiting to be sponsored.

LATEST STORIES FROM ALBINO PEACEMAKERS